Lasciate ogni speranza voi ch’entrate: Upgrade to Vista!

The gibberish in the title of this blog is from Dante’s Inferno, and is usually translated as “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.” Like many others, until I looked this up I was under the misapprehension that the Inferno was written in Latin. It’s not: It’s in Tuscan which, at the time it was written (between 1308 and 1321 AD), was a more or less separate dialect of the modern language we today call Italian. But this phrase conveys the fear and trepidation inherent to going certain places where we’ve all been told, often many times, that it’s best to stay away from.

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Repair a dropped Vista Wi-Fi Connection

Blogger Rick Fairlie at ZDnet has posted a story that outlines a strategy for dealing with Wi-Fi links that come up and work, however briefly, but then go down and refuse to come back up until you reboot your notebook PC. Having suffered from this phenomenon myself on numerous notebooks–I test ’em for <a href=”http://www.tomsguide.com” target=”_blank”>TomsGuide.com</a>, to the tune of between one and two dozen new notebooks per year–I was definitely interested to read and learn from his advice.

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Smart Use of DriverAgent Improves Driver Update Results

I’ve been a fan of and subscriber to the Driver Updates Web site at www.DriverAgent.com for over two years, and have found it to be a reasonably safe and workable way to keep PC drivers up to date. Because I run anywhere from four to seven machines at any given moment—the actual count depends on how many projects I’ve got going and what requirements my test machines must satisfy—this involves at least four hours a month of my time just in keeping up with changes, updates, and so forth. Whenever I build a new machine (to the tune of a dozen or more each year) or test a ready-made PC (to the tune of a couple of dozen notebooks and as many as a dozen desktops) ensuring drivers are current and correct is important for testing and benchmarking.

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Asus Eee PC: Small but Potent

The Asus Eee PC represents a new type of machine on the notebook landscape: it’s neither a conventional, full sized budget notebook with a 12-15″ screen, nor is it a so-called ultra-mobile PC (UMPC): a relatively expensive but diminutive PC with a high-resolution 7″ display. Rather the Asus EEE stakes out its own relatively new ground on the budget notebook landscape as a machine with UMPC dimensions, very low cost, but also, low electrical power consumption and low-end computing power and capability.

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